Nazi Wireless Propaganda: Lord Haw-Haw and British Public Opinion in the Second World War

Doherty, M.A. 2000. Nazi Wireless Propaganda: Lord Haw-Haw and British Public Opinion in the Second World War. Edinburgh Edinburgh University Press.

TitleNazi Wireless Propaganda: Lord Haw-Haw and British Public Opinion in the Second World War
AuthorsDoherty, M.A.
Abstract

This is the first book devoted exclusively to the analysis of the Nazis' radio effort against the United Kingdom during the Second World War. It traces the development of the German propaganda service and looks to erode the myth surrounding Lord Haw-Haw -the 'superpropagandist'. Propaganda is presented in context: the purposes behind it, the changing patterns, themes, styles, and techniques employed, and the impact upon the target audience and its morale. An analysis of the Nazi wireless broadcasts to Britain for the whole of the Second World War reveals a sophisticated and intelligent propaganda assault on the social and economic fabric of British society. In the end the British failed to succumb to the stupefying effects of Nazi propaganda and they traditionally congratulate themselves upon the national unity which immunised them against it. The author argues that this traditional view disguises a more complex, less appealing reality. Free CD Includes a CD of 24 German wartime broadcasts to Britain Key Features: *Exposition of organisational structure of Nazi wireless for the UK *Detailed analysis of style and content of propaganda broadcasts *Careful and critical re-appraisal of British domestic morale and national unity *CD insert of 24 recordings of Nazi broadcasters including William Joyce, John Amery, Edward Dietze, Norman Baillie-Stewart, Edward Bowlby and 'Black' propaganda broadcasts

KeywordsPublic Opinion, Propaganda, Radio, William Joyce, Lord Haw-Haw
Year2000
PublisherEdinburgh University Press
Publication dates
Published27 Jan 2000
Place of publicationEdinburgh
ISBN 0748613633

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