Introducing the VIMSSQ: Measuring susceptibility to visually induced motion sickness

Keshavarz, Behrang, Saryazdi, Raheleh, Campos, Jennifer L. and Golding, John F. 2019. Introducing the VIMSSQ: Measuring susceptibility to visually induced motion sickness. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting. 63 (1), pp. 2267-2271. https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181319631216

TitleIntroducing the VIMSSQ: Measuring susceptibility to visually induced motion sickness
TypeJournal article
AuthorsKeshavarz, Behrang, Saryazdi, Raheleh, Campos, Jennifer L. and Golding, John F.
AbstractVisually induced motion sickness (VIMS) is a specific form of motion sickness caused by dynamic visual content such as Virtual Reality applications. Predicting individual susceptibility to VIMS has proven to be difficult and a reliable method has yet to emerge. Here, we introduce the Visually Induced Motion Sickness Susceptibility Questionnaire (VIMSSQ), a modification of the Motion Sickness Susceptibility Questionnaire uniquely designed to predict the susceptibility to VIMS specifically. Scores on the VIMSSQ are based on incidences of nausea, headache, fatigue, dizziness, and eyestrain during the past use of visual devices. In this proof-of-concept study, 71 adult participants (34 younger, 37 older) engaged in a simulated driving task and VIMS was measured using the Fast Motion Sickness Scale. Strong correlations with the reported level of VIMS were found for the nausea aspects of the VIMSSQ, suggesting that the VIMSSQ may be a useful tool to estimate individuals’ susceptibility to VIMS.
JournalProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting
Journal citation63 (1), pp. 2267-2271
ISSN2169-5067
1071-1813
Year2019
PublisherSage
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1177/1071181319631216
Publication dates
Published online20 Nov 2019

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