Transdifferentiation of mature cortical cells to functional abscission cells in bean

McManus, M.T., Thompson, D.S., Merriman, C., Lyne, L. and Osborne, D.J. 1998. Transdifferentiation of mature cortical cells to functional abscission cells in bean. Plant Physiology. 116 (3), pp. 891-899. doi:10.​1104/​pp.​116.​3.​891

TitleTransdifferentiation of mature cortical cells to functional abscission cells in bean
AuthorsMcManus, M.T., Thompson, D.S., Merriman, C., Lyne, L. and Osborne, D.J.
Abstract

Abscission explants of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) were treated with ethylene to induce cell separation at the primary abscission zone. After several days of further incubation of the remaining petiole in endogenously produced ethylene, the distal two-thirds of the petiole became senescent, and the remaining (proximal) portion stayed green. Cell-to-cell separation (secondary abscission) takes place precisely at the interface between the senescing yellow and the enlarging green cells. The expression of the abscission-associated isoform of β-1,4-glucanhydrolase, the activation of the Golgi apparatus, and enhanced vesicle formation occurred only in the enlarging cortical cells on the green side. These changes were indistinguishable from those that occur in normal abscission cells and confirm the conversion of the cortical cells to abscission-type cells. Secondary abscission cells were also induced by applying auxin to the exposed primary abscission surface after the pulvinus was shed, provided ethylene was added. Then, the orientation of development of green and yellow tissue was reversed; the distal tissue remained green and the proximal tissue yellowed. Nevertheless, separation still occurred at the junction between green and yellow cells and, again, it was one to two cell layers of the green side that enlarged and separated from their senescing neighbors. Evaluation of Feulgen-stained tissue establishes that, although nuclear changes occur, the conversion of the cortical cell to an abscission zone cell is a true transdifferentiation event, occurring in the absence of cell division.

JournalPlant Physiology
Journal citation116 (3), pp. 891-899
ISSN0032-0889
YearMar 1998
PublisherAmerican Society of Plant Biologists
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.​1104/​pp.​116.​3.​891
Web address (URL)http://www.plantphysiol.org/content/116/3/891
Publication dates
PublishedMar 1998

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