The Use of Dietary Supplements Among African and Caribbean Women Living in the UK: A Cross-sectional Study

Adegboye, A.R.A., Ojo, O. and Begum, G. 2020. The Use of Dietary Supplements Among African and Caribbean Women Living in the UK: A Cross-sectional Study. Nutrients. 12 (3) 847. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030847

TitleThe Use of Dietary Supplements Among African and Caribbean Women Living in the UK: A Cross-sectional Study
TypeJournal article
AuthorsAdegboye, A.R.A., Ojo, O. and Begum, G.
Abstract

Previous studies have shown that the use of dietary supplements is associated with the prevention of birth defects, negative pregnancy outcomes and cardiovascular diseases. However, there might be some ethnic disparities in supplement usage suggesting that women who could benefit from it are not frequent users. This study aimed to characterise the use of dietary supplement among Black African and Black Caribbean women living in the United Kingdom (UK). Furthermore, it evaluated possible associations between the use of dietary supplements and health and diet awareness. A total of 262 women self-ascribed as Black African and Black Caribbean living in the UK completed a comprehensive questionnaire on socio-demographic factors, diet, use of supplements and cultural factors. The main outcome variable was the regular use of any type of dietary supplement. Use of vitamin D and/or calcium was also explored. A stepwise logistic regression analysis was applied to identify predictors of regular use of dietary supplements. A total of 33.2% of women reported regular use of any dietary supplements and 16.8% reported use of vitamin D and/or calcium. There were no significant ethnic differences in the use of dietary supplements. Reporting use of the back of food packaging label (odds ratio (OR) 2.21; 95% CI 1.07–4.55); a self-rated healthy diet (OR 2.86; 95% CI 1.19–6.91) and having cardiovascular disease (CVD), hypertension and/or high cholesterol (OR 3.81; 95% CI 1.53–9.49) increased the likelihood of using any dietary supplement. However, having poorer awareness decreased the likelihood (OR 0.94; 95% CI 0.88–0.99) of using any dietary supplement. For the use of vitamin D and/or calcium supplements, the main predictor was having CVD, hypertension and/or high cholesterol (OR 4.43; 95% CI 1.90–10.35). The prevalence of dietary supplement use was low among African and Caribbean women. Thus, awareness of potential benefits of some dietary supplements (e.g., vitamin D) among the Black population should be promoted

KeywordsAfrican; Caribbean; ethnic minority; dietary supplement; vitamin D; women
Article number847
JournalNutrients
Journal citation12 (3)
ISSN2072-6643
Year2020
PublisherMDPI
Publisher's version
License
CC BY 4.0
File Access Level
Open (open metadata and files)
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030847
Publication dates
Published22 Mar 2020

Related outputs

"I've Seen You": A conversation about the Transformative Potential of Working in Partnership
Fraser, J., Usman, M., Thomas, K.C., Ahmed, M., Dolidze, A., Zuruwath Zareer, F., Begum, G., Elliott, B. and Macleod, E. 2020. "I've Seen You": A conversation about the Transformative Potential of Working in Partnership. in: Mercer-Mapstone, L. and Abbot, S. (ed.) The Power of Partnership: Students, Staff and Faculty Revolutionizing Higher Education Elon, North Carolina Elon University. pp. 205-219

Co-Administration of Iron and a Bioavailable Curcumin Supplement Increases Serum BDNF Levels in Healthy Adults
Lorinczova, H., Fitzsimons, O., Mursaleen, L., Renshaw, D., Begum, G. and Zariwala, M. 2020. Co-Administration of Iron and a Bioavailable Curcumin Supplement Increases Serum BDNF Levels in Healthy Adults. Antioxidants. 9 (8) 645. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9080645

Attitudinal Determinants of diet and lifestyle among African and Caribbean women living in the UK : study design and rationale - Diets of African and Caribbean women
Adegboye, A.R.A., Moore, A.P., Comegna, S., Tewfik, I., Draper, A. and Begum, G. 2020. Attitudinal Determinants of diet and lifestyle among African and Caribbean women living in the UK : study design and rationale - Diets of African and Caribbean women. World Nutrition. 11 (1), pp. 97-109. https://doi.org/10.26596/wn.202011197-109

Carnosine supplementation does not improve high intensity exercise performance
Leveritt, M., Begum, G. and Cunliffe, A. 2006. Carnosine supplementation does not improve high intensity exercise performance. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. 9 (Supplement 1), p. 9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2006.12.017

Physiological role of carnosine in contracting muscle
Begum, G., Cunliffe, A. and Leveritt, M. 2005. Physiological role of carnosine in contracting muscle. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism. 15 (5), pp. 493-514.

Effect of basic and advanced formulation carbohydrate-electrolyte drinks on physical and mental performance during high-intensity intermittent exercise
Begum, G., Cunliffe, A. and Leveritt, M. 2005. Effect of basic and advanced formulation carbohydrate-electrolyte drinks on physical and mental performance during high-intensity intermittent exercise. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society. 64 (1 (special issue)).

Permalink - https://westminsterresearch.westminster.ac.uk/item/qz11x/the-use-of-dietary-supplements-among-african-and-caribbean-women-living-in-the-uk-a-cross-sectional-study


Share this
Tweet
Email

Usage statistics

4 total views
5 total downloads
0 views this month
1 downloads this month
These values are for the period from September 2nd 2018, when this repository was created

Export as