Testing the association of growth mindset and grades across a challenging transition: Is growth mindset associated with grades?

Li, Y. and Bates, T.C. 2020. Testing the association of growth mindset and grades across a challenging transition: Is growth mindset associated with grades? Intelligence. 81 101471. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.intell.2020.101471

TitleTesting the association of growth mindset and grades across a challenging transition: Is growth mindset associated with grades?
TypeJournal article
AuthorsLi, Y. and Bates, T.C.
Abstract

Mindset theory predicts that whether students believe basic ability is greatly malleable exerts a major influence on their own educational attainment (Blackwell, Trzesniewski, & Dweck, 2007). We tested this prediction in two near-replication studies (total n = 832). In study 1 we tested the association of mindset with university grades in a cross-sectional design involving self-reported grades for 246 undergraduates. Growth mindset showed no association with grades (β = −0.02 CI95 [−0.16, 0.12], t = −0.26, p = .792). In study 2, we implemented a longitudinal design, testing the association of mindset with grade transcript scores across a series of challenging transitions: from high school to university entry, and then across all years of an undergraduate degree (n = 586). Contrary to prediction, mindset was not associated with grades across the challenging transition from high-school to the first year of university (β = −0.05 CI95 [−0.14, 0.05], t = −0.95, p = .345). In addition, mindset was unrelated to entry grades (p = .808). And no support was found for a predicted interaction of mindset with academic disadvantage across the transition (β = −0.03 CI95 [−0.12, 0.07], t = −0.54, p = .592). Follow-up analyses showed no association of mindset with improvement in grades at any subsequent year of the degree (minimum p-value 0.591). Jointly, these two near-replication studies suggest that, even across challenging transitions, growth mindset is either unrelated to educational attainment or has a very small negative influence.

KeywordsIntelligence-mindset
Educational attainment
Growth mindset
Challenging transitions
Article number101471
JournalIntelligence
Journal citation81
ISSN0160-2896
Year2020
PublisherElsevier
Publisher's version
License
CC BY 4.0
File Access Level
Open (open metadata and files)
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1016/j.intell.2020.101471
Web address (URL)https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160289620300490?casa_token=FhgliKwONnsAAAAA:3GhLcB--GG9ACloh87BkWT5EWSw9IC541hBczlOGgByklf7vhux0Exn6RfHZZB2BH9Aolyp2EJU
Publication dates
Published15 Jul 2020

Related outputs

You can’t change your basic ability, but you work at things, and that’s how we get hard things done: Testing the role of growth mindset on response to setbacks, educational attainment, and cognitive ability
Li, Y. and Bates, T.C. 2019. You can’t change your basic ability, but you work at things, and that’s how we get hard things done: Testing the role of growth mindset on response to setbacks, educational attainment, and cognitive ability. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General. 148 (9), pp. 1640-1655. https://doi.org/10.1037/xge0000669

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