Trekking poles reduce exercise-induced muscle injury during mountain walking

Howatson, G., Hough, P., Pattison, J., Hill, J., Blagrove, R., Glaister, M. and Thompson, Kevin G. 2011. Trekking poles reduce exercise-induced muscle injury during mountain walking. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. https://doi.org/10.1249/mss.0b013e3181e4b649

TitleTrekking poles reduce exercise-induced muscle injury during mountain walking
TypeJournal article
AuthorsHowatson, G., Hough, P., Pattison, J., Hill, J., Blagrove, R., Glaister, M. and Thompson, Kevin G.
Abstract

Temporary muscle damage precipitated by downhill walking affects muscle function and potentially exposes muscle to further musculoskeletal injury.

Purpose:
We hypothesized that the use of trekking poles would help maintain muscle function and reduce indices of muscle damage after a day's mountain trekking.

Methods:
Thirty-seven physically active males (n = 26) and females (n = 11) volunteered to participate and were divided into either a trekking pole (TP) or no pole (NP) group. Participants carried a day sack (5.6 ± 1.5 kg) and made the ascent and descent of the highest peak in England and Wales (Mount Snowdon). HR and RPE were recorded during the ascent and descent. Indices of muscle damage, namely, maximal voluntary contraction, muscle soreness, creatine kinase (CK), and vertical jump performance, were measured before, immediately after (except CK), and 24, 48, and 72 h after trek.

Results:
HR was not different between groups, although RPE was significantly lower in TP during the ascent. The TP group showed attenuation of reductions in maximal voluntary contraction immediately after and 24 and 48 h after the trek; muscle soreness was significantly lower at 24 and 48 h after the trek, and CK was also lower at 24 h after the trek in the TP group. No differences in vertical jump were found.

Conclusions:
Trekking poles reduce RPE on mountain ascents, reduce indices of muscle damage, assist in maintaining muscle function in the days after a mountain trek, and reduce the potential for subsequent injury.

JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
ISSN0195-9131
Year2011
PublisherWolters Kluwer
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1249/mss.0b013e3181e4b649
PubMed ID20473229
Web address (URL)http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/20473229
Publication dates
PublishedJan 2011

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