The Role of Emotion in Global Warming Policy Support and Opposition

Smith, N. and Leiserowitz, A. 2014. The Role of Emotion in Global Warming Policy Support and Opposition. Risk Analysis. 34 (5), p. 937–948. doi:10.1111/risa.12140

TitleThe Role of Emotion in Global Warming Policy Support and Opposition
AuthorsSmith, N. and Leiserowitz, A.
Abstract

Prior research has found that affect and affective imagery strongly influence public support for global warming. This article extends this literature by exploring the separate influence of discrete emotions. Utilizing a nationally representative survey in the United States, this study found that discrete emotions were stronger predictors of global warming policy support than cultural worldviews, negative affect, image associations, or sociodemographic variables. In particular, worry, interest, and hope were strongly associated with increased policy support. The results contribute to experiential theories of risk information processing and suggest that discrete emotions play a significant role in public support for climate change policy. Implications for climate change communication are also discussed.

JournalRisk Analysis
Journal citation34 (5), p. 937–948
ISSN0272-4332
Year2014
PublisherWiley
Publisher's versionSmith_et_al-2014-Risk_Analysis.pdf
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1111/risa.12140
Publication dates
PublishedMay 2014
Published12 Nov 2013
LicenseCC BY 3.0

Related outputs

Affective Imagery, Risk Perceptions, and Climate Change Communication
Leiserowitz, A. and Smith, N. 2017. Affective Imagery, Risk Perceptions, and Climate Change Communication. in: Oxford Encyclopaedia of Climate Science Oxford Oxford University Press.

Catholics and Climate Change Skepticism
Vincentnathan, L., Vincentnathan, S.G. and Smith, N. 2016. Catholics and Climate Change Skepticism. Worldviews: Global Religions, Culture, and Ecology. 20 (2), pp. 125-149. doi:10.1163/15685357-02002005

City dweller aspirations for cities of the future: How do environmental and personal wellbeing feature?
Joffe, H. and Smith, N. 2016. City dweller aspirations for cities of the future: How do environmental and personal wellbeing feature? Cities. 59, pp. 102-112. doi:10.1016/j.cities.2016.06.006

Social Representations of Threatening Phenomena: The Self-Other Thema and Identity Protection
Smith, N., O'Connor, C. and Joffe, H. 2015. Social Representations of Threatening Phenomena: The Self-Other Thema and Identity Protection. Papers on Social Representations. 24 (2), pp. 1.1-1.23.

Climate change and visual imagery
O'Neill, S. and Smith, N. 2014. Climate change and visual imagery. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change. 5 (1), pp. 73-87. doi:10.1002/wcc.249

American evangelicals and global warming
Smith, N. and Leiserowitz, A. 2013. American evangelicals and global warming. Global Environmental Change. 23 (5), p. 1009–1017. doi:10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2013.04.001

Climategate, Public Opinion, and the Loss of Trust
Leiserowitz, A., Maibach, E., Roser-Renouf, C., Smith, N. and Dawson, E. 2013. Climategate, Public Opinion, and the Loss of Trust. American Behavioral Scientist. 57 (6), pp. 818-837. doi:10.1177/0002764212458272

How the public engages in climate change: A social representations approach
Smith, N. and Joffe, H. 2013. How the public engages in climate change: A social representations approach. Public Understanding of Science. 22 (1), pp. 16-32. doi:10.1177/0963662512440913

The rise of global warming scepticism: exploring affective image associations over time
Smith, N. and Leiserowitz, A. 2012. The rise of global warming scepticism: exploring affective image associations over time. Risk Analysis. 32 (6), pp. 1021-1032. doi:10.1111/j.1539-6924.2012.01801.x

Climate change in the British press: The role of the visual
Smith, N. and Joffe, H. 2009. Climate change in the British press: The role of the visual. Journal of Risk Research. 12 (5), pp. 647-663. doi:10.1080/13669870802586512

Permalink - https://westminsterresearch.westminster.ac.uk/item/9vw4q/the-role-of-emotion-in-global-warming-policy-support-and-opposition


Share this
Tweet
Email