Global Warming Risk Perceptions in India

Thaker, J., Smith, Nicholas and Leiserowitz, Anthony 2020. Global Warming Risk Perceptions in India. Risk analysis : an official publication of the Society for Risk Analysis. 40 (12), pp. 2481-2497. https://doi.org/10.1111/risa.13574

TitleGlobal Warming Risk Perceptions in India
TypeJournal article
AuthorsThaker, J., Smith, Nicholas and Leiserowitz, Anthony
AbstractFew studies have focused on global warming risk perceptions among people in poor and developing countries, who are disproportionately impacted by climate change. This analysis conducts a comprehensive assessment of global warming risk perceptions in India using a national sample survey. Consistent with cultural theory, egalitarianism was positively associated with global warming risk perceptions. In addition, perceived vulnerability and resilience to extreme weather events were also two of the strongest factors associated with global warming risk perceptions. While worry was positively associated with risk perceptions, it accounted for only a small proportion of the variance, unlike studies in developed countries. Finally, the study also collected global warming affective images. The most common responses were "don't know" or "can't say" (25%), followed by "pollution" (21%), "heat" (20%), and "nature" (16%). The study finds that the predictors of global warming risk perceptions among the Indian public are both similar and different than those in developed countries, which has important implications for climate change communication in India. [Abstract copyright: © 2020 Society for Risk Analysis.]
KeywordsAffective imagery
India
cultural worldviews
perceived vulnerability and resilience
risk perceptions
JournalRisk analysis : an official publication of the Society for Risk Analysis
Journal citation40 (12), pp. 2481-2497
ISSN1539-6924
Year2020
PublisherWiley
Accepted author manuscript
File Access Level
Open (open metadata and files)
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.1111/risa.13574
PubMed ID32790198
Publication dates
Published online13 Aug 2020
Published in printDec 2020

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