Student Satisfaction Negates Pedagogic Rights, Theirs and Ours!

Barnes, C. and Jenkins, C. 2014. Student Satisfaction Negates Pedagogic Rights, Theirs and Ours! Student Engagement and Experience Journal. 3 (2). doi:10.7190/seej.v3i2.97

TitleStudent Satisfaction Negates Pedagogic Rights, Theirs and Ours!
AuthorsBarnes, C. and Jenkins, C.
Abstract

This article outlines how the potential for students to be co-participants, via a critical education, risks being further co-opted through the marketization of higher education by constructing students as consumers with power over academics to make judgments on pedagogic quality through student satisfaction ratings. We start by outlining the relevant components of marketization processes, and their associated practices of financialization and managerialism that have developed in response to the “legitimation crisis” in HE and argue that these have profoundly altered the university landscape with a significant impact on our working practices. Student engagement is increasingly being appropriated as a quantifiable measurement of “student satisfaction”, which then profoundly alters the teaching and learning experience with different understandings of what acquiring knowledge requires and what it feels like. We draw on our experience of working in the post 1992 sector to describe how we are increasingly working under conditions of “reified exchange” and how this affects our relationships with students, other academics and management, eroding our pedagogic rights and theirs in the process. Specifically, we conclude that marketization is likely to further reduce the institutional space and opportunities for both lecturers and students to exercise their “pedagogic rights” to personal enhancement, social inclusion and civic participation through education.

KeywordsStudent engagment, pedagogic rights, marketisation of HE; legitimation crisis
JournalStudent Engagement and Experience Journal
Journal citation3 (2)
ISSN2047-9476
Year2014
PublisherSheffield Hallam University
Publisher's version97-423-2-PB(2).pdf
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.7190/seej.v3i2.97
Web address (URL)http://research.shu.ac.uk/SEEJ/index.php/seej/article/view/97
Publication dates
Published2014

Related outputs

Conducting an Exploratory Survey of a Little Researched Marginalised Transnational Migrant Community
Jenkins, C. and Cetin, U. 2018. Conducting an Exploratory Survey of a Little Researched Marginalised Transnational Migrant Community. Sage.

From a ‘sort of Muslim’ to ‘proud to be Alevi’: The Alevi Religion and Identity Project combatting the negative identity among second-generation Alevis in the UK
Jenkins, C. and Cetin, U. 2018. From a ‘sort of Muslim’ to ‘proud to be Alevi’: The Alevi Religion and Identity Project combatting the negative identity among second-generation Alevis in the UK. National Identities . 20 (1), pp. 105-123. doi:10.1080/14608944.2016.1244933

Editorial of Special Issue of National Identities: Alevism as an ethno-religious identity: Contested boundaries
Jenkins, C., Aydin, S. and Cetin, U. 2018. Editorial of Special Issue of National Identities: Alevism as an ethno-religious identity: Contested boundaries. National Identities. 20 (1), pp. 1-7. doi:10.1080/14608944.2016.1244934

Sociological Knowledge and Transformation at ‘Diversity University’, UK
Jenkins, C., Barnes, C., McLean, M., Abbas, A. and Ashwin, P. 2017. Sociological Knowledge and Transformation at ‘Diversity University’, UK. in: Walker, M. and Wilson-Strydom, M. (ed.) Socially Just Pedagogies, Capabilities and Quality in Higher Education Basingstoke Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 45-67

Women in the driving seat Eastern European immigrant women s citizenship participation and educational inclusion in Portugal
Araujo, H., Branco Sousa, S., Tereshchenko, A. and Jenkins, C. 2015. Women in the driving seat Eastern European immigrant women s citizenship participation and educational inclusion in Portugal. Citizenship Studies. 19 (3-4), pp. 384-399. doi:10.1080/13621025.2015.1006577

Minority ethno-faith communities and social inclusion through collaborative research
Jenkins, C. 2014. Minority ethno-faith communities and social inclusion through collaborative research. Insights. 9 (Autumn), pp. 1-4.

The troubling concept of class: reflecting on our ‘failure’ to encourage sociology students to re-cognise their classed locations using autobiographical methods
Jenkins, C., Canaan, J., Filippakou, O. and Strudwick, K. 2011. The troubling concept of class: reflecting on our ‘failure’ to encourage sociology students to re-cognise their classed locations using autobiographical methods. ELiSS, online. 3 (3), pp. 1-30. doi:10.11120/elss.2011.03030013

All in a day's work
Swirsky, R. and Jenkins, C. 2009. All in a day's work. in: Cameron, D. and Scanlon, J. (ed.) The trouble and strife reader Bloomsbury Press.

Permalink - https://westminsterresearch.westminster.ac.uk/item/9w6q3/student-satisfaction-negates-pedagogic-rights-theirs-and-ours


Share this
Tweet
Email