Plagiarism – a hanging offence or poor referencing

Shine, G. and Rhodes, G. 2010. Plagiarism – a hanging offence or poor referencing. Centre for Bioscience Representatives Forum. Cardiff Sep 2010

TitlePlagiarism – a hanging offence or poor referencing
AuthorsShine, G. and Rhodes, G.
TypeConference poster
Abstract

A new Academic Integrity Policy was agreed by Academic Council in July 2009, one of the key aims of which is to distinguish poor scholarship from academic misconduct. For this reason there is now a change of emphasis from punishment to education, whilst maintaining the highest levels of academic conduct. Although it is the aim of Academic Services to ensure that the University’s assessment regulations are applied consistently, it is evident that individual academics vary in their approach to detecting and reporting cases of plagiarism, particularly in cases where the plagiarism is relatively minor.

A survey of staff approaches to plagiarism was carried out within the School of Life Sciences during July to September 2009 in order to establish staff development needs for the implementation of the policy. The response rate was a creditable 63%, and it was clear that a small number of respondents appeared to have extreme views with regard to plagiarism. Whilst most staff agreed that a tolerant approach to plagiarism undermines the integrity of University of Westminster degrees, there was a clear need to establish a consistent approach across the school. A key emerging theme was that the majority of academics felt that it would be important to discuss individual occurrences of plagiarism with colleagues. For this reason SLS has appointed key individuals to advise colleagues on appropriate responses to cases of plagiarism as ‘gatekeepers’.

Year2010
ConferenceCentre for Bioscience Representatives Forum

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