Physical activity barriers in the workplace : an exploration of factors contributing to non-participation in a UK workplace physical activity intervention

Edmunds, S., Hurst, L. and Harvey, K. 2013. Physical activity barriers in the workplace : an exploration of factors contributing to non-participation in a UK workplace physical activity intervention. International Journal of Workplace Health Management. 6 (3), pp. 227-240.

TitlePhysical activity barriers in the workplace : an exploration of factors contributing to non-participation in a UK workplace physical activity intervention
AuthorsEdmunds, S., Hurst, L. and Harvey, K.
Abstract

Purpose– The purpose of this paper is to explore factors contributing to non-participation in a workplace physical activity (PA) intervention in a large UK call centre.

Design/methodology/approach – In total, 16 inactive individuals (nine male/seven female), aged 27±9 years, who had not taken part in the intervention were interviewed to explore their perceptions of PA, the intervention and factors which contributed to their non-participation. Transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings – Six superordinate themes were identified: self-efficacy for exercise; attitudes towards PA; lack of time and energy; facilities and the physical environment; response to the PA programme and PA culture. Barriers occurred at multiple levels of influence, and support the use of ecological or multilevel models to help guide future programme design/delivery.

Research limitations/implications – The 16 participants were not selected to be representative of the workplace gender or structure. Future intentions relating to PA participation were not considered and participants may have withheld negative opinions about the workplace or intervention despite use of an external researcher.

Practical implications – In this group of employees education about the importance of PA for young adults and providing opportunities to gain social benefits from PA would increase perceived benefits and reduce perceived costs of PA. Workplace cultural norms with respect to PA must also be addressed to create a shift in PA participation.

Originality/value – Employees’ reasons for non-participation in workplace interventions remain poorly understood and infrequently studied. The study considers a relatively under-studied population of employed young adults, providing practical recommendations for future interventions.

JournalInternational Journal of Workplace Health Management
Journal citation6 (3), pp. 227-240
ISSN1753-8351
Year2013
PublisherEmerald
FileEdmunds_et_al_2012_final_author.pdf
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1108/IJWHM-11-2010-0040
Publication dates
Published2013

Related outputs

The role of peer physical activity champions in the workplace: a qualitative study
Edmunds, S. and Clow, A. 2016. The role of peer physical activity champions in the workplace: a qualitative study. Perspectives in Public Health. 136 (3), pp. 161-170.

Doing qualitative research in dentistry and dental education
Edmunds, S. and Brown, G. 2012. Doing qualitative research in dentistry and dental education. European Journal of Dental Education. 16 (2), pp. 110-117.

Doing pedagogical research in engineering
Brown, G. and Edmunds, S. 2011. Doing pedagogical research in engineering. Loughborough Engineering Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning: Loughborough University.

Effective small group learning: AMEE Guide No. 48
Edmunds, S. and Brown, G. 2010. Effective small group learning: AMEE Guide No. 48. Medical Teacher. 32 (9), pp. 715-726.

Wellbeing: conceptual issues and implications for interdisciplinary work
Edmunds, S. 2010. Wellbeing: conceptual issues and implications for interdisciplinary work. Journal of Holistic Healthcare. 7 (1), pp. 9-12.

AMEE Guide 48: Effective Small Group Learning
Edmunds, S. and Brown, G. 2010. AMEE Guide 48: Effective Small Group Learning. Dundee Association for Medical Education in Europe.

Levels and patterns of physical activity in children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes and associated metabolic and physiologic health outcomes
Edmunds, S., Roche, D.M. and Stratton, G. 2010. Levels and patterns of physical activity in children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes and associated metabolic and physiologic health outcomes. Journal of Physical Activity and Health. 7 (1), pp. 68-77.

Learning from lectures
Edmunds, S. and Brown, G. 2009. Learning from lectures. in: Dent, J.A. and Harden, R.M. (ed.) A practical guide for medical teachers. 3rd edition Edinburgh Elsevier.

Skin microvascular reactivity in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes in relation to levels of physical activity and aerobic fitness
Roche, D.M., Edmunds, S., Cable, T., Didi, M. and Stratton, G. 2008. Skin microvascular reactivity in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes in relation to levels of physical activity and aerobic fitness. Pediatric Exercise Science. 20 (4), pp. 426-438.

Physical activity and psychological well-being in children with Type 1 diabetes
Edmunds, S., Roche, D.M., Stratton, G., Wallymahmed, A.K. and Glenn, S.M. 2007. Physical activity and psychological well-being in children with Type 1 diabetes. Psychology, Health and Medicine. 12 (3), pp. 353-363.

Child Health Assessment at School Entry (CHASE) project: evaluation in 10 London primary schools
Edmunds, S., Garratt, A., Haines, L. and Blair, M. 2005. Child Health Assessment at School Entry (CHASE) project: evaluation in 10 London primary schools. Child: Care, Health and Development. 31 (2), pp. 143-154.

Development of a questionnaire to collect public health data for school entrants in London: Child Health Assessment at School Entry (CHASE) project
Edmunds, S., Haines, L. and Blair, M. 2005. Development of a questionnaire to collect public health data for school entrants in London: Child Health Assessment at School Entry (CHASE) project. Child: Care, Health and Development. 31 (1), pp. 89-97.

Permalink - https://westminsterresearch.westminster.ac.uk/item/8yz85/physical-activity-barriers-in-the-workplace-an-exploration-of-factors-contributing-to-non-participation-in-a-uk-workplace-physical-activity-intervention


Share this
Tweet
Email