Child Health Assessment at School Entry (CHASE) project: evaluation in 10 London primary schools

Edmunds, S., Garratt, A., Haines, L. and Blair, M. 2005. Child Health Assessment at School Entry (CHASE) project: evaluation in 10 London primary schools. Child: Care, Health and Development. 31 (2), pp. 143-154.

TitleChild Health Assessment at School Entry (CHASE) project: evaluation in 10 London primary schools
AuthorsEdmunds, S., Garratt, A., Haines, L. and Blair, M.
Abstract

Aims - To assess the feasibility of implementing the Child Health Assessment at School Entry (CHASE) questionnaire, developed to capture the multiple dimensions of the health of children in their first year at school, and to evaluate data quality, reliability and validity.

Methods - Parents of 278 year-1 children, from 10 primary schools in two London boroughs, received a parent questionnaire and school nurses completed a separate questionnaire from health and education records for children whose parents consented. Additional data on free school meal eligibility and ethnicity were obtained from the two Local Education Authorities. The parent questionnaire included the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and four dimensions of the Child Health Questionnaire Parent Form-28 (CHQ-PF28).

Results - Response rate was 61%. The association between school free school meals eligibility and response rate in each school approached significance (r = –0.62, P = 0.05). Data completeness of the parent questionnaire was high (mean 98%). Data completeness of the school nurse questionnaire was more variable (mean 82%). Cronbach's Alpha was greater than 0.6 for four of the five SDQ scales and greater than 0.7 for the two CHQ-PF28 multi-item scales. Relative to parents with qualifications, parents with no qualifications rated their children as having significantly more conduct problems, peer problems, and overall mental health problems (P < 0.01) as assessed by the SDQ, and significantly lower global health (P < 0.01) as assessed by the CHQ-PF28. Children with special educational needs and children with long-standing illness or disability were rated as having significantly lower global health (P < 0.05) than children without these. Sample tables of inter-school and inter-borough comparison of key findings demonstrate considerable differences in physical and mental health status.

Discussion - The questionnaire was acceptable to parents and school nurses, and feasible to implement within existing school resources. Initial tests of internal reliability and validity are satisfactory. These data have the potential to inform interventions and service provision at school and borough level, and public health trends over time.

JournalChild: Care, Health and Development
Journal citation31 (2), pp. 143-154
ISSN0305-1862
YearMar 2005
PublisherWiley
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1111/j.1365-2214.2004.00461.x
Publication dates
PublishedMar 2005

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Development of a questionnaire to collect public health data for school entrants in London: Child Health Assessment at School Entry (CHASE) project
Edmunds, S., Haines, L. and Blair, M. 2005. Development of a questionnaire to collect public health data for school entrants in London: Child Health Assessment at School Entry (CHASE) project. Child: Care, Health and Development. 31 (1), pp. 89-97.

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