Biological Cycles and Cognition

Law, R. and Maguire, M. 2016. Biological Cycles and Cognition. in: Groome, D. and Eysenck, M. (ed.) An Introduction to Applied Cognitive Psychology (Second Edition) Psychology Press. pp. 253-286

Chapter titleBiological Cycles and Cognition
AuthorsLaw, R. and Maguire, M.
EditorsGroome, D. and Eysenck, M.
Abstract

This chapter reviews the ways in which cognitive performance is influenced by biological rhythms, including both circadian (about 24 hours) and ultradian (more than 24 hours) rhythms in humans. The chapter begins with a summary and description of biological rhythms, entrainment of circadian rhythms, and the function of circadian clocks. We then review the research exploring numerous factors influencing cognition, including both awakening and time-of-day effects on cognitive performance, the sleep-wake cycle, shift work, jet lag, fatigue, and the menstrual cycle. The chapter aims to provide a clear explanation of the latest research on all of these topics, and suggests ways by which our understanding of this research can be applied within a range of settings, including the workplace environment, in understanding health and illness, and in our general day-to-day activities. The chapter concludes with a summary and a list of key points.

KeywordsCircadian rhythms
Time-of-day
Sleep
Shift work
Jet lag
Fatigue
Menstrual cycle
Book titleAn Introduction to Applied Cognitive Psychology (Second Edition)
Page range253-286
Year2016
PublisherPsychology Press
Publication dates
Published23 Mar 2016
ISBN9781138840133

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