Illness perceptions, coping and quality of life in patients with alopecia

Cartwright, T., Endean, N. and Porter, A. 2009. Illness perceptions, coping and quality of life in patients with alopecia. British Journal of Dermatology. 160 (5), pp. 1034-1039.

TitleIllness perceptions, coping and quality of life in patients with alopecia
AuthorsCartwright, T., Endean, N. and Porter, A.
Abstract

Background: Alopecia can have substantial psychological consequences, but there has been no research looking at patients' beliefs about their condition nor how they relate to quality of life (QoL).

Objectives To investigate the relationships between illness perceptions, coping and QoL in patients with alopecia.

Methods: The study employed a cross-sectional design. In total, 214 individuals with alopecia were recruited from four internet support groups. There were 171 women and 43 men (mean age 35 years). Participants completed an online questionnaire comprising the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire, the Dermatology Life Quality Index and the brief COPE.

Results: The findings indicate several areas in which alopecia impacted on individuals' QoL, particularly in relation to symptoms and feelings. Women reported poorer QoL compared with men. Impaired QoL was associated with a strong illness identity, beliefs in the serious consequences of alopecia and strong emotional representations. Hierarchical multiple regressions indicated that illness perceptions accounted for 35% of the variance in QoL after controlling for demographic and disease factors, with coping adding a further 7% to the regression model. Conclusions: Although alopecia is not a life-threatening condition, it can impair QoL by negatively impacting on self-awareness. The strong relationships found between patients' beliefs about their condition and QoL suggests that health professionals should recognize the psychological impact of alopecia and address negative beliefs and emotions surrounding the condition in treatment programmes.

JournalBritish Journal of Dermatology
Journal citation160 (5), pp. 1034-1039
ISSN0007-0963
YearMay 2009
PublisherBlackwell
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)doi:10.1111/j.1365-2133.2008.09014.x
Publication dates
PublishedMay 2009

Related outputs

Exploring suicidal behaviours by probation clients—a qualitative near-lethal study
Mackenzie, J.-M., Borrill, J. and Cartwright, T. 2018. Exploring suicidal behaviours by probation clients—a qualitative near-lethal study. The Journal of Public Health. 40 (1), pp. 146-153.

Parental feeding behaviour and motivations regarding pre-school age children: a thematic synthesis of qualitative studies
Rylatt, L. and Cartwright, T. 2016. Parental feeding behaviour and motivations regarding pre-school age children: a thematic synthesis of qualitative studies. Appetite. 99, pp. 285-297.

New Ways of Being a Man: “Positive” Hegemonic Masculinity in Meditation-based Communities of Practice
Lomas, Tim, Cartwright, T., Edginton, T.L. and Ridge, Damien T. 2016. New Ways of Being a Man: “Positive” Hegemonic Masculinity in Meditation-based Communities of Practice. Men and Masculinities. 19 (3), pp. 289-310.

Men’s strategies for preserving emotional well-being in advanced prostate cancer: an interpretative phenomenological analysis
Levy, A. and Cartwright, T. 2015. Men’s strategies for preserving emotional well-being in advanced prostate cancer: an interpretative phenomenological analysis. Psychology and Health. 30 (10), pp. 1164-82.

Cultivating equanimity through mindfulness meditation: a mixed methods enquiry into the development of decentring capabilities in men
Lomas, T., Edginton, T.L., Cartwright, T. and Ridge, Damien T. 2015. Cultivating equanimity through mindfulness meditation: a mixed methods enquiry into the development of decentring capabilities in men. International Journal of Wellbeing. 5 (3), pp. 88-106.

Probation staff experiences of managing suicidal and self-harming service users
Mackenzie, J.-M., Cartwright, T., Beck, A. and Borrill, J. 2015. Probation staff experiences of managing suicidal and self-harming service users. Probation Journal. 62 (2), pp. 111-127.

Pakistani children’s experiences of growing up with Beta-Thalassemia Major
Mufti, G.E.R., Towell, A. and Cartwright, T. 2015. Pakistani children’s experiences of growing up with Beta-Thalassemia Major. Qualitative Health Research. 25 (3), pp. 386-96.

Engagement with meditation as a positive health trajectory: Divergent narratives of progress in male meditators
Lomas, Tim, Ridge, Damien T., Cartwright, T. and Edginton, T.L. 2014. Engagement with meditation as a positive health trajectory: Divergent narratives of progress in male meditators. Psychology & Health. 29 (2), pp. 218-236.

Journeys of adjustment: the experiences of adolescents living with juvenile idiopathic arthritis
Cartwright, T., Fraser, E., Edmunds, S., Wilkinson, N. and Jacobs, K. 2014. Journeys of adjustment: the experiences of adolescents living with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Child: Care, Health and Development. 41 (5), pp. 734-43.

Internet self-efficacy does not predict student use of Internet-mediated educational technology
Buchanan, T., Joban, S. and Porter, A. 2014. Internet self-efficacy does not predict student use of Internet-mediated educational technology. Research in Learning Technology. 22, p. 19585.

Men developing emotional intelligence through meditation? Integrating narrative, cognitive and electroencephalography (EEG) evidence
Lomas, Tim, Edginton, T.L., Cartwright, T. and Ridge, Damien T. 2014. Men developing emotional intelligence through meditation? Integrating narrative, cognitive and electroencephalography (EEG) evidence. Psychology of Men & Masculinity. 15 (2), pp. 213-224.

A religion of wellbeing? The appeal of Buddhism to men in London, United Kingdom
Lomas, Tim, Cartwright, T., Edginton, T.L. and Ridge, Damien T. 2014. A religion of wellbeing? The appeal of Buddhism to men in London, United Kingdom. Psychology of Religion and Spirituality. 6 (3), pp. 198-207.

A qualitative analysis of experiential challenges associatedwith meditation practice
Lomas, Tim, Cartwright, T., Edginton, T.L. and Ridge, Damien T. 2014. A qualitative analysis of experiential challenges associatedwith meditation practice. Mindfulness.

“Mirror, mirror…” A preliminary investigation of skin tone dissatisfaction and its impact among British adults
Swami, V., Henry, A., Peacock, N., Roberts-Dunn, A. and Porter, A. 2013. “Mirror, mirror…” A preliminary investigation of skin tone dissatisfaction and its impact among British adults. Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology. 19 (4), pp. 468-476.

I was so done in that I just recognized it very plainly, “You need to do something”’: men’s narratives of struggle, distress and turning to meditation
Lomas, Tim, Cartwright, T., Edginton, T.L. and Ridge, Damien T. 2013. I was so done in that I just recognized it very plainly, “You need to do something”’: men’s narratives of struggle, distress and turning to meditation. Health. 17 (2), pp. 191-208.

Technoself Enhanced Blended Learning via Social Interaction
Jin, L., Porter, A. and Saunders, G. 2013. Technoself Enhanced Blended Learning via Social Interaction. The Second International Conference on E-Learning and E-Technologies in Education (ICEEE2013), 23-25 Sept, pp. 74-80, 2013. . Lodz, Poland 23 Sep 2013 IEEE .

Psychology: yesterday and today
Porter, A. 2013. Psychology: yesterday and today. in: Comer, R., Gould, E. and Furnham, A. (ed.) Psychology Wiley.

‘Getting on with life’: the experiences of older people using complementary health care
Cartwright, T. 2012. ‘Getting on with life’: the experiences of older people using complementary health care. in: Traditional, Complementary and Integrative Medicine: An International Reader London Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 53-60

Men behaving well? Journeys towards constructive engagement with well-being through meditation
Lomas, T., Cartwright, T., Edginton, T.L. and Ridge, Damien T. 2011. Men behaving well? Journeys towards constructive engagement with well-being through meditation. BSA Medical Sociology Group 43rd Annual Conference 2011. University of Chester 14 - 16 Sep 2011

Men behaving well? Journeys towards constructive engagement with well-being through meditation
Lomas, T., Cartwright, T., Edginton, T.L. and Ridge, Damien T. 2011. Men behaving well? Journeys towards constructive engagement with well-being through meditation. 7th Biennial Conference of the International Society of Critical Health Psychology (ISCHP). Adelaide, South Australia 18 -20 Apr 2011

Men behaving well?: Journeys towards constructive engagement with well-being through meditation
Lomas, T., Cartwright, T., Edginton, T.L. and Ridge, Damien T. 2010. Men behaving well?: Journeys towards constructive engagement with well-being through meditation. Psychology & Health. 25 (S1), p. 265.

Factors leading to student success in a UK first year university cohort
Hixenbaugh, P., Porter, A. and Williams, D. 2009. Factors leading to student success in a UK first year university cohort. in: Proceedings of the International Conference on Educational Sciences. Volume 3 ICES'08.

Complementary medicine and health psychology
Cartwright, T., van Wersch, A. and Forshaw, M. 2009. Complementary medicine and health psychology. Open University Press.

A thematic analysis of childrens' experiences of living with thalassemia major in Pakistan
Mufti, G.E.R., Cartwright, T. and Towell, A. 2008. A thematic analysis of childrens' experiences of living with thalassemia major in Pakistan. Psychology & Health. 23 (S1), p. 189.

'Getting on with life': the experiences of older people using complementary health care
Cartwright, T. 2007. 'Getting on with life': the experiences of older people using complementary health care. Social Science & Medicine. 64 (8), pp. 1692-1703.

Making sense of illness: the experiences of users of complementary medicine
Cartwright, T. and Torr, R. 2005. Making sense of illness: the experiences of users of complementary medicine. Journal of Health Psychology. 10 (4), pp. 559-572.

Permalink - https://westminsterresearch.westminster.ac.uk/item/90q64/illness-perceptions-coping-and-quality-of-life-in-patients-with-alopecia


Share this
Tweet
Email