Ketosis Suppression and Ageing (KetoSAge): The Effects of Suppressing Ketosis in Long Term Keto-Adapted Non-Athletic Females

Isabella D. Cooper, Yvoni Kyriakidou, Kurtis Edwards, Lucy Petagine, Thomas N. Seyfried, Tomas Duraj, Adrian Soto-Mota, Andrew Scarborough, Sandra L. Jacome, Kenneth Brookler, Valentina Borgognoni, Vanusa Novaes, Rima Al-Faour and Bradley T. Elliott 2023. Ketosis Suppression and Ageing (KetoSAge): The Effects of Suppressing Ketosis in Long Term Keto-Adapted Non-Athletic Females. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 24 (21) 15621. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms242115621

TitleKetosis Suppression and Ageing (KetoSAge): The Effects of Suppressing Ketosis in Long Term Keto-Adapted Non-Athletic Females
TypeJournal article
AuthorsIsabella D. Cooper, Yvoni Kyriakidou, Kurtis Edwards, Lucy Petagine, Thomas N. Seyfried, Tomas Duraj, Adrian Soto-Mota, Andrew Scarborough, Sandra L. Jacome, Kenneth Brookler, Valentina Borgognoni, Vanusa Novaes, Rima Al-Faour and Bradley T. Elliott
Abstract

Most studies on ketosis have focused on short-term effects, male athletes, or weight loss. Hereby, we studied the effects of short-term ketosis suppression in healthy women on long-standing ketosis. Ten lean (BMI 20.5 ± 1.4), metabolically healthy, pre-menopausal women (age 32.3 ± 8.9) maintaining nutritional ketosis (NK) for > 1 year (3.9 years ± 2.3) underwent three 21-day phases: nutritional ketosis (NK; P1), suppressed ketosis (SuK; P2), and returned to NK (P3). Adherence to each phase was confirmed with daily capillary D-beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) tests (P1 = 1.9 ± 0.7; P2 = 0.1 ± 0.1; and P3 = 1.9 ± 0.6 mmol/L). Ageing biomarkers and anthropometrics were evaluated at the end of each phase. Ketosis suppression significantly increased: insulin, 1.78-fold from 33.60 (± 8.63) to 59.80 (± 14.69) mmol/L (p = 0.0002); IGF1, 1.83-fold from 149.30 (± 32.96) to 273.40 (± 85.66) µg/L (p = 0.0045); glucose, 1.17-fold from 78.6 (± 9.5) to 92.2 (± 10.6) mg/dL (p = 0.0088); respiratory quotient (RQ), 1.09-fold 0.66 (± 0.05) to 0.72 (± 0.06; p = 0.0427); and PAI-1, 13.34 (± 6.85) to 16.69 (± 6.26) ng/mL (p = 0.0428). VEGF, EGF, and monocyte chemotactic protein also significantly increased, indicating a pro-inflammatory shift. Sustained ketosis showed no adverse health effects, and may mitigate hyperinsulinemia without impairing metabolic flexibility in metabolically healthy women.

Article number15621
JournalInternational Journal of Molecular Sciences
Journal citation24 (21)
ISSN1422-0067
Year2023
PublisherMDPI
Publisher's version
License
CC BY 4.0
File Access Level
Open (open metadata and files)
Digital Object Identifier (DOI)https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms242115621
Web address (URL)https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms242115621
Publication dates
Published26 Oct 2023

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